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AIDS Behav. 2018 Jul;22(Suppl 1):114-120. doi: 10.1007/s10461-018-2208-0.

Early Breastfeeding Cessation Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women in Western Cape Province, South Africa.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics & Child Health, Stellenbosch University, Francie van Zijl Drive, Cape Town, 8000, South Africa. moleenz@sun.ac.za.
2
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Global Health, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa. moleenz@sun.ac.za.
3
Department of Pathology, Immunology Unit, National Health Laboratory Service, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.
4
Department of Paediatrics & Child Health, Stellenbosch University, Francie van Zijl Drive, Cape Town, 8000, South Africa.
5
School of Population & Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
6
Vaccine Evaluation Center, BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
7
Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Washington, DC, USA.

Abstract

As part of the Mother-Infant Health Study, we describe infant feeding practices among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers over a 12-month period when the Western Cape Province prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) program was transitioning from a policy of exclusive formula feeding to one of exclusive breastfeeding. Two hundred pairs of mother and HIV-uninfected infant were included in the analysis, among whom 81 women were HIV uninfected and breastfeeding. Of the 119 HIV-infected mothers, 50 (42%) were breastfeeding and 69 (58%) were formula feeding. HIV-infected mothers predominantly breastfed for 8.14 (7.71-15.86) weeks; HIV-uninfected mothers predominantly breastfed for 8.29 (8.0-16.0) weeks; and HIV-infected mothers predominantly formula fed for 50.29 (36.43-51.43) weeks. A woman's HIV status had no influence on the time to stopping predominant breastfeeding (Pā€‰=ā€‰0.20). Our findings suggest suboptimal duration of breastfeeding among both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers. Providing support for all mothers postdelivery, regardless of their HIV status, may improve breastfeeding practices.

KEYWORDS:

Early breastfeeding cessation; HIV/AIDS; Prevention of mother-to-child transmission

PMID:
29959720
PMCID:
PMC6091631
[Available on 2019-07-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-018-2208-0

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