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Cogn Process. 2018 Nov;19(4):545-555. doi: 10.1007/s10339-018-0866-5. Epub 2018 Jun 29.

Social behaviour and social cognition in high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD): two sides of the same coin?

Author information

1
Academic Centre for Epileptology (ACE), Kempenhaeghe, Heeze, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Neurology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
3
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Medical Psychology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
5
Special Education School De Berkenschutse, Heeze, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
7
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. r.kessels@donders.ru.nl.
8
Department of Medical Psychology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. r.kessels@donders.ru.nl.
9
Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Venray, The Netherlands. r.kessels@donders.ru.nl.
10
Department of Neuropsychology and Rehabilitation Psychology, Donders Centre for Cognition, Radboud University, Montessorilaan 3, 6525 HR, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. r.kessels@donders.ru.nl.

Abstract

Of the triad of symptoms found in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), that is, social impairments, communication difficulties and repetitive interests and behaviour, the social impairments are the most stable and common throughout the lifespan. They typically manifest themselves in abnormalities as reciprocal interactions and difficulties in the expression and recognition of emotions. Although peer interactions become especially important during adolescence, little is known about the mentalizing abilities of high-functioning adolescents with ASD. Here, we compared the mentalizing skills and emotion recognition abilities of 21 high-functioning adolescents with ASD and 21 matched controls. All adolescents had estimated above-average verbal intelligence levels. Spontaneous social abilities and task-related social abilities were measured using questionnaires, tasks and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Results confirm social impairment in daily life situations in adolescents with ASD, but were not found on experimental tasks of social cognition. The use of more explicit cognitive or verbally mediating reasoning techniques and a lesser tendency of high-functioning adolescents with ASD to search for and use social information in natural environments are further discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Above-average intelligence; Adolescents; Autism; Ecological validity; Social behaviour; Social cognition; Theory of mind

PMID:
29959562
DOI:
10.1007/s10339-018-0866-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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