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Sci Rep. 2018 Jun 29;8(1):9831. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-28186-3.

Creation of independently controllable multiple focal spots from segmented Pancharatnam-Berry phases.

Author information

1
MOE Key Laboratory of Material Physics and Chemistry under Extraordinary Conditions, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Optical information Technology, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an, 710129, China. pengli@nwpu.edu.cn.
2
MOE Key Laboratory of Material Physics and Chemistry under Extraordinary Conditions, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Optical information Technology, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an, 710129, China.
3
MOE Key Laboratory of Material Physics and Chemistry under Extraordinary Conditions, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Optical information Technology, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an, 710129, China. jlzhao@nwpu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Recently, based on space-variant Pancharatnam-Berry (PB) phases, various flat devices allowing abrupt changes of beam parameters have been predicted and demonstrated to implement intriguing manipulation on spin states in three dimensions, including the efficient generation of vector beams, spin Hall effect of light and light-guiding confinement, and so on. Here, we report on the construction of independently controllable multiple focal spots with different inhomogeneous polarization states by utilizing segmented PB phases. Combining the phase shift approach with PB phases, we engineer fan-shaped segmented PB phases and encode them onto two spin components that compose a hybrid polarized vector beam in a modified common-path interferometer system. Experimental results demonstrate that the fan-shaped segmented PB phase enables the flexible manipulation of focal number, array structure and polarization state of each focal spot. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this fan-shaped approach enables to flexibly tailor the polarization state and the spin angular momentum distribution of a tightly focused field, which have potential applications in optical manipulation, tailored optical response and imaging etc.

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