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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2018 Aug;111:26-31. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.05.024. Epub 2018 May 22.

Utilization of diagnostic testing for pediatric sensorineural hearing loss.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.
2
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.
3
Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine in Rabigh, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
4
Department of Family Medicine, St. John's Episcopal Hospital, Cedarhurst, NY, USA.
5
Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: michael_cohen@meei.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE:

Sensorineural hearing loss is a common diagnosis among children. The diagnostic workup varies widely among practitioners. This study's aim was to assess the utilization of diagnostic testing for SNHL and determine the yield of each test.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective chart review.

SETTING:

Tertiary care center.

SUBJECTS:

827 patients with a diagnosis of SNHL from January 1, 2011 to January 1, 2015.

RESULTS:

746 patients met inclusion criteria. Temporal bone imaging was performed on 561 (75%) of patients with 224 (40%) having positive results that explained the etiology of the SNHL. Congenital SNHL was more likely to be associated with abnormal imaging than acquired SNHL (109/299 versus 106/316 respectively) (p = 0.001). Unilateral SNHL was more likely to be associated imaging abnormalities than bilateral SNHL (101/221 and 123/340 respectively) (p = 0.028). Genetic testing was performed on 244 (33%) patients, of which 94 (39%) had abnormalities. Positive genetics results were more common with bilateral than unilateral SNHL (82/191 and 12/53 respectively) (p = 0.007). There was no statistically significant difference in the utility of genetic testing for congenital and acquired SNHL (p = 0.0836). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) testing was available for 104 (14%) of patients with 13 (12.5%) being positive and consistent with congenital CMV. Electrocardiogram, urinalysis, and Lyme titers were less useful.

CONCLUSIONS:

Imaging and genetic testing had the highest yield in the evaluation of children with SNHL and were the most commonly performed. CMV testing was valuable in neonates who failed newborn hearing screening.

KEYWORDS:

Acquired; Bilateral; Congenital; Diagnostic testing; Pediatric sensorineural hearing loss; Unilateral; Utilization; Workup

PMID:
29958610
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.05.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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