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Exp Clin Transplant. 2019 Jun;17(3):355-362. doi: 10.6002/ect.2017.0302. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Patient Sex in the Setting of Liver Transplant in Alcoholic Liver Disease.

Author information

1
From the Department of Legal and Forensic Medicine, Biomedical Research Institute, Regional Campus of International Excellence "Campus Mare Nostrum," Faculty of Medicine, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain; and the Immunology Service, Instituto Murciano de Investigación Biosanitaria and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to analyze alcoholic cirrhosis in women who were to undergo liver transplant, including their biochemical and clinical characteristics, main complications, survival rates, and main causes of death compared with men with alcoholic cirrhosis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Our study included 400 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, which we divided according to sex and viral infections. Biochemical parameters and the presence and degree of ascites and encephalopathy, liver function status, and liver rejection and survival rates were analyzed from 1 to 10 years and the main cause of death at 10 years.

RESULTS:

Patients with nonviral alcoholic cirrhosis and liver transplant had significantly better survival rates (84.1%) at 1 year versus those with viral alcoholic cirrhosis (74.5%; P = .036). Men with nonviral alcoholic cirrhosis (14%) and women with hepatitis C virus (29%) had the lowest short-term survival rates. In long-term survival analysis, the lowest rate was observed in women with nonviral alcoholic cirrhosis (26.1%), and the highest rate was observed in women with hepatitis C virus (42.9%). Liver graft failure was one of the main causes of death in male patients (19.5%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Women with alcoholic cirrhosis showed a higher rate of ascites and encephalopathy but lower liver graft rejection than men with alcoholic cirrhosis. Survival rates were similar between men and women, although slightly lower in women who had hepatitis C virus.

PMID:
29957165
DOI:
10.6002/ect.2017.0302
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