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Intensive Care Med. 2018 Sep;44(9):1436-1446. doi: 10.1007/s00134-018-5266-x. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Increasing evidence-based interventions in patients with acute infections in a resource-limited setting: a before-and-after feasibility trial in Gitwe, Rwanda.

Author information

1
Gitwe Hospital and Gitwe School of Medicine, Gitwe, Rwanda.
2
Department of Surgery, California Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA.
3
Great Lakes Free University, Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo.
4
Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda.
5
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, USA.
6
Division of Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
7
Division of Pulmonology, Department of Medicine, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
8
Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
9
BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
10
Institute of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria.
11
Society of Critical Care Medicine on behalf of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, Mount Prospect, IL, USA.
12
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
13
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Kepler University Hospital and Johannes Kepler University Linz, Linz, Austria. Martin.Duenser@i-med.ac.at.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate whether a focused education program and implementation of a treatment bundle increases the rate of early evidence-based interventions in patients with acute infections.

DESIGN:

Single-center, prospective, before-and-after feasibility trial.

SETTING:

Emergency department of a sub-Saharan African district hospital.

PATIENTS:

Patients > 28 days of life admitted to the study hospital for an acute infection.

INTERVENTIONS:

The trial had three phases (each of 4 months). Interventions took place during the second (educational program followed by implementation of the treatment bundle) and third (provision of resources to implement treatment bundle) phases.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected at study enrollment; 24, 48, and 72 h after hospital admission; and at discharge. A total of 1594 patients were enrolled (pre-intervention, n = 661; intervention I, n = 531; intervention II, n = 402). The rate of early evidence-based interventions per patient during Intervention Phase I was greater than during the pre-intervention phase (74 ± 17 vs. 79 ± 15%, p < 0.001). No difference was detected when data were compared between Intervention Phases I and II (79 ± 15 vs. 80 ± 15%, p = 0.58). No differences in the incidence of blood transfusion (pre-intervention, 6%; intervention I, 7%; intervention II, 7%) or severe adverse events in the first 24 h (allergic reactions: pre-intervention, 0.2%; intervention I, 0%; intervention II, 0%; respiratory failure: pre-intervention, 2%; intervention I, 2%; intervention II, 2%; acute renal failure: pre-intervention, 2%; intervention I, 2%; intervention II, 1%) were observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate that a focused education program and implementation of an infection treatment bundle in clinical practice increased the rate of early evidence-based interventions in patients with acute infections (mostly malaria) admitted to a sub-Saharan African district hospital. Provision of material resources did not further increase this rate. While no safety issues were detected, this could be related to the very low disease severity of the enrolled patient population ( http://www.clinicaltrials.gov : NCT02697513).

KEYWORDS:

Africa; Bundle; Education; Evidence-based intervention; Infection; Safety; Sepsis

PMID:
29955924
DOI:
10.1007/s00134-018-5266-x

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