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Am J Clin Nutr. 2018 Aug 1;108(2):371-380. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/nqy102.

Higher spermidine intake is linked to lower mortality: a prospective population-based study.

Author information

1
Departments of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
2
King's British Heart Foundation Center, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Bruneck Hospital, Bruneck, Italy.
5
First Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Geriatric Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.
6
Department of Acute Neurology and Stroke, Feldkirch Academic Teaching Hospital, Feldkirch, Austria.
7
Institute of Molecular Biosciences, University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Graz, Austria.
8
BioTechMed Graz, Graz, Austria.
9
Department of Pathological Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
10
Institute of Pharmacy/Pharmacognosy.
11
Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
12
Equipe 11 labellisée Ligue Contre le Cancer, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
13
Cell Biology and Metabolomics Platforms, Gustave Roussy Comprehensive Cancer Center, Villejuif, France.
14
Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale, U1138, Paris, France.
15
Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.
16
Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France.
17
Pôle de Biologie, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France.
18
Departments of Internal Medicine I, Gastroenterology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.

Abstract

Background:

Spermidine administration is linked to increased survival in several animal models.

Objective:

The aim of this study was to test the potential association between spermidine content in diet and mortality in humans.

Design:

This prospective community-based cohort study included 829 participants aged 45-84 y, 49.9% of whom were male. Diet was assessed by repeated dietitian-administered validated food-frequency questionnaires (2540 assessments) in 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010. During follow-up between 1995 and 2015, 341 deaths occurred.

Results:

All-cause mortality (deaths per 1000 person-years) decreased across thirds of increasing spermidine intake from 40.5 (95% CI: 36.1, 44.7) to 23.7 (95% CI: 20.0, 27.0) and 15.1 (95% CI: 12.6, 17.8), corresponding to an age-, sex- and caloric intake-adjusted 20-y cumulative mortality incidence of 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45, 0.51), 0.41 (95% CI: 0.38, 0.45), and 0.38 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.41), respectively. The age-, sex- and caloric ratio-adjusted HR for all-cause death per 1-SD higher spermidine intake was 0.74 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.83; P < 0.001). Further adjustment for lifestyle factors, established predictors of mortality, and other dietary features yielded an HR of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.86; P < 0.001). The association was consistent in subgroups, robust against unmeasured confounding, and independently validated in the Salzburg Atherosclerosis Prevention Program in Subjects at High Individual Risk (SAPHIR) Study (age-, sex-, and caloric ratio-adjusted HR per 1-SD higher spermidine intake: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.95; P = 0.019). The difference in mortality risk between the top and bottom third of spermidine intakes was similar to that associated with a 5.7-y (95% CI: 3.6, 8.1 y) younger age.

Conclusion:

Our findings lend epidemiologic support to the concept that nutrition rich in spermidine is linked to increased survival in humans. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03378843.

Comment in

PMID:
29955838
DOI:
10.1093/ajcn/nqy102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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