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Nat Commun. 2018 Jun 27;9(1):2505. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-04723-6.

Uncovering hidden brain state dynamics that regulate performance and decision-making during cognition.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. taghia@stanford.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. wdcai@stanford.edu.
3
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. menon@stanford.edu.
5
Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. menon@stanford.edu.
6
Stanford Neuroscience Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. menon@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Human cognition is influenced not only by external task demands but also latent mental processes and brain states that change over time. Here, we use novel Bayesian switching dynamical systems algorithm to identify hidden brain states and determine that these states are only weakly aligned with external task conditions. We compute state transition probabilities and demonstrate how dynamic transitions between hidden states allow flexible reconfiguration of functional brain circuits. Crucially, we identify latent transient brain states and dynamic functional circuits that are optimal for cognition and show that failure to engage these states in a timely manner is associated with poorer task performance and weaker decision-making dynamics. We replicate findings in a large sample (N = 122) and reveal a robust link between cognition and flexible latent brain state dynamics. Our study demonstrates the power of switching dynamical systems models for investigating hidden dynamic brain states and functional interactions underlying human cognition.

PMID:
29950686
PMCID:
PMC6021386
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-04723-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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