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Nat Neurosci. 2018 Jul;21(7):952-962. doi: 10.1038/s41593-018-0174-5. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Dorsal tegmental dopamine neurons gate associative learning of fear.

Author information

1
Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), Vienna Biocenter (VBC), Vienna, Austria.
2
Institute of Physiology (Medical Faculty), and Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences (CBBS), Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany.
3
Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
4
Preclinical Phenotyping Facility, Vienna Biocenter Core Facilities (VBCF), Vienna Biocenter (VBC), Vienna, Austria.
5
Brains On-Line, Charles River Laboratories, San Francisco, California, USA.
6
Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), Vienna Biocenter (VBC), Vienna, Austria. wulf.haubensak@imp.ac.at.

Abstract

Functional neuroanatomy of Pavlovian fear has identified neuronal circuits and synapses associating conditioned stimuli with aversive events. Hebbian plasticity within these networks requires additional reinforcement to store particularly salient experiences into long-term memory. Here we have identified a circuit that reciprocally connects the ventral periaqueductal gray and dorsal raphe region with the central amygdala and that gates fear learning. We found that ventral periaqueductal gray and dorsal raphe dopaminergic (vPdRD) neurons encode a positive prediction error in response to unpredicted shocks and may reshape intra-amygdala connectivity via a dopamine-dependent form of long-term potentiation. Negative feedback from the central amygdala to vPdRD neurons might limit reinforcement to events that have not been predicted. These findings add a new module to the midbrain dopaminergic circuit architecture underlying associative reinforcement learning and identify vPdRD neurons as a critical component of Pavlovian fear conditioning. We propose that dysregulation of vPdRD neuronal activity may contribute to fear-related psychiatric disorders.

PMID:
29950668
PMCID:
PMC6166775
DOI:
10.1038/s41593-018-0174-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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