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Cell Rep. 2018 Jun 26;23(13):3960-3974. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2018.04.011.

DFR1-Mediated Inhibition of Proline Degradation Pathway Regulates Drought and Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
School of Food Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009, China.
2
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2333, USA.
3
School of Food Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009, China; School of Horticulture, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, China. Electronic address: liuyongsheng1122@hfut.edu.cn.
4
School of Food Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009, China. Electronic address: shuqingcao@hfut.edu.cn.

Abstract

Proline accumulation is one of the most important adaptation mechanisms for plants to cope with environmental stresses, such as drought and freezing. However, the molecular mechanism of proline homeostasis under these stresses is largely unknown. Here, we identified a mitochondrial protein, DFR1, involved in the inhibition of proline degradation in Arabidopsis. DFR1 was strongly induced by drought and cold stresses. The dfr1 knockdown mutants showed hypersensitivity to drought and freezing stresses, whereas the DFR1 overexpression plants exhibited enhanced tolerance, which was positively correlated with proline levels. DFR1 interacts with proline degradation enzymes PDH1/2 and P5CDH and compromises their activities. Genetic analysis showed that DFR1 acts upstream of PDH1/2 and P5CDH to positively regulate proline accumulation. Our results demonstrate a regulatory mechanism by which, under drought and freezing stresses, DFR1 interacts with PDH1/2 and P5CDH to abrogate their activities to maintain proline homeostasis, thereby conferring drought and freezing tolerance.

KEYWORDS:

Arabidopsis; DFR1; P5CDH; PDH1; PDH2; drought; freezing; proline degradation

PMID:
29949777
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.04.011
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