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Clin Chem Lab Med. 2018 Nov 27;56(12):2079-2087. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2018-0042.

Increased serum concentrations of soluble ST2 predict mortality after burn injury.

Author information

1
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
2
Department of Facial Plastic Surgery, Marienhospital Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany, Phone: +43 1 40400 56160.
3
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Konventhospital Barmherzige Brueder Linz, Linz, Austria.
4
Department of Surgery, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.
5
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Franziskus Spital, Vienna, Austria.
6
Department of Anesthesiology, General Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
7
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konventhospital Barmherzige Brueder Linz, Linz, Austria.
8
Department of Clinical Pathology, Hospital of Bolzano, Bolzano, Italy.
9
Division of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
10
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Cardiac and Thoracic Diagnosis and Regeneration, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
11
Department of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Large burn injuries induce a systemic response in affected patients. Soluble ST2 (sST2) acts as a decoy receptor for interleukin-33 (IL-33) and has immunosuppressive effects. sST2 has been described previously as a prognostic serum marker. Our aim was to evaluate serum concentrations of sST2 and IL-33 after thermal injury and elucidate whether sST2 is associated with mortality in these patients.

METHODS:

We included 32 burn patients (total body surface area [TBSA] >10%) admitted to our burn intensive care unit and compared them to eight healthy probands. Serum concentrations of sST2 and IL-33 were measured serially using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique.

RESULTS:

The mean TBSA was 32.5%±19.6%. Six patients (18.8%) died during the hospital stay. Serum analyses showed significantly increased concentrations of sST2 and reduced concentrations of IL-33 in burn patients compared to healthy controls. In our study cohort, higher serum concentrations of sST2 were a strong independent predictor of mortality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Burn injuries cause an increment of sST2 serum concentrations with a concomitant reduction of IL-33. Higher concentrations of sST2 are associated with increased in-hospital mortality in burn patients.

KEYWORDS:

ST2; burn injury; burn trauma; interleukin-33; mortality; sST2

PMID:
29949506
DOI:
10.1515/cclm-2018-0042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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