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Neurotherapeutics. 2018 Jul;15(3):628-634. doi: 10.1007/s13311-018-0637-0.

Now is the Critical Time for Engineered Neuroplasticity.

Moritz CT1,2,3,4,5,6,7.

Author information

1
Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ctmoritz@uw.edu.
2
Department of Physiology & Biophysics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ctmoritz@uw.edu.
3
Graduate Program in Neuroscience, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ctmoritz@uw.edu.
4
UW Institute of Neuroengineering (UWIN), University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ctmoritz@uw.edu.
5
Washington Spinal Cord Injury Consortium, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ctmoritz@uw.edu.
6
Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering, Seattle, WA, USA. ctmoritz@uw.edu.
7
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington , Box 356490, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. ctmoritz@uw.edu.

Abstract

Recent advances in neuroscience and devices are ushering in a new generation of medical treatments. Engineered biodevices are demonstrating the potential to create long-term changes in neural circuits, termed neuroplasticity. Thus, the approach of engineering neuroplasticity is rapidly expanding, building on recent demonstrations of improved quality of life for people with movement disorders, epilepsy, and spinal cord injury. In addition, discovering the fundamental mechanisms of engineered neuroplasticity by leveraging anatomically well-documented systems like the spinal cord is likely to provide powerful insights into solutions for other neurotraumas, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, as well as neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson disease, and multiple sclerosis. Now is the time for advancing both the experimental neuroscience, device development, and pioneering human trials to reap the benefits of engineered neuroplasticity as a therapeutic approach for improving quality of life after spinal cord injury.

KEYWORDS:

Spinal cord injury·epidural stimulation·intraspinal microstimulation·transcutaneous stimulation·combinatorial therapies·stem cells.

PMID:
29948920
PMCID:
PMC6095787
DOI:
10.1007/s13311-018-0637-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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