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Int J Epidemiol. 2018 Aug 1;47(4):1141-1150. doi: 10.1093/ije/dyy110.

Placental weight and birthweight: the relations with number of daily cigarettes and smoking cessation in pregnancy. A population study.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
2
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Campus Ahus, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
3
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
4
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

Background:

We studied associations of number of daily cigarettes in the first trimester with placental weight and birthweight in women who smoked throughout pregnancy, and in women who stopped smoking after the first trimester.

Methods:

We included all women with delivery of a singleton in Norway (n = 698 891) during 1999-2014, by using data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We assessed dose-response associations by applying linear regression with restricted cubic splines.

Results:

In total, 12.6% smoked daily in the first trimester, and 3.7% stopped daily smoking. In women who smoked throughout pregnancy, placental weight and birthweight decreased by number of cigarettes; however, above 11-12 cigarettes we estimated no further decrease (Pnon-linearity < 0.001). Maximum decrease in placental weight in smokers compared with non-smokers was 18.2 g [95% confidence interval (CI): 16.6 to 19.7], and for birthweight the maximum decrease was 261.9 g (95% CI: 256.1 to 267.7). In women who stopped smoking, placental weight was higher than in non-smokers and increased by number of cigarettes to a maximum of 16.2 g (95% CI: 9.9 to 22.6). Birthweight was similar in women who stopped smoking and non-smokers, and we found no change by number of cigarettes (Pnon-linearity < 0.001).

Conclusions:

In women who smoked throughout pregnancy, placental weight and birthweight decreased non-linearly by number of cigarettes in the first trimester. In women who stopped smoking, placental weight was higher than in non-smokers and increased linearly by number of cigarettes; birthweight was almost similar to that of non-smokers.

PMID:
29947760
PMCID:
PMC6124614
DOI:
10.1093/ije/dyy110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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