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J Adv Nurs. 2018 Nov;74(11):2555-2565. doi: 10.1111/jan.13776. Epub 2018 Aug 28.

The impact of burnout on self-efficacy, outcome expectations, career interest and nurse turnover.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Department of Nursing, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
College of Health Professions, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota.
4
Quality Management Department, Administration Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
5
Department of Health Care Management, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
6
Graduate Institute of Business and Management, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
7
Department of Rehabilitation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan.
8
Department of Business and Management, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taiwan.

Abstract

AIMS:

To examine the impact of burnout on self-efficacy, outcome expectations, career interest and on nurses' intentions to leave the profession and to leave the organization.

BACKGROUND:

Burnout is associated with nurse turnover. Research clarifying the underlying mechanism may provide a novel means to mitigate the impact of burnout on nurse turnover.

DESIGN:

This study uses a cross-sectional design and proportionate stratified sampling.

METHODS:

Data were collected from a sample of nurses in one medical centre in northern Taiwan during February - March 2017. This study included nurses employed full-time at the medical centre. Burnout was measured using Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey. Self-efficacy, outcome expectations and career interest were measured using the scale of Cunningham et al. Intentions to leave were measured using the scales of Teng et al. Structural equation modelling was used to assess the proposed framework.

RESULTS:

Burnout was negatively related to self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Self-efficacy was positively related to outcome expectations. Outcome expectations were also positively related to career interest. However, self-efficacy was not related to career interest. Career interest was negatively related to the intention to leave the organization, which was further related to the intention to leave the profession. The model fitted the data acceptably.

CONCLUSIONS:

When nurses leave the profession, patient outcomes may be affected. Policy makers should evaluate whether the healthcare system can instil expectations for satisfaction, power and adequate compensation in the profession and thus retain nurses.

KEYWORDS:

burnout; career; cognitive theory; nurse; self-efficacy; turnover

PMID:
29943839
DOI:
10.1111/jan.13776
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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