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Korean J Gastroenterol. 2018 Jun 25;71(6):338-348. doi: 10.4166/kjg.2018.71.6.338.

Gastrointestinal cancer risk in patients with a family history of gastrointestinal cancer.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, National Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Medicine, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea.
7
Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
8
Department of Gastroenterology, Myongji Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
9
Department of Gastroenterology, Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan, Korea.

Abstract

Background/Aims:

This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between family history of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers and incidence of any GI cancer in the Korean population.

Methods:

Between January 2015 and July 2016, 711 GI cancer patients and 849 controls in 16 hospitals in Korea were enrolled. Personal medical histories, life styles, and family history of GI cancers were collected via questionnaire.

Results:

There was a significant difference in the incidence of family history of GI cancer between GI cancer patients and controls (p=0.002). Patients with family history of GI cancer tended to be diagnosed as GI cancer at younger age than those without family history (p=0.016). The family members of GI cancer patients who were diagnosed before 50 years of age were more frequently diagnosed as GI cancer before the age of 50 years (p=0.017). After adjusting for major confounding factors, age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI]; 1.053-1.076), male gender (AOR 2.270, 95% CI; 1.618-3.184), smoking (AOR 1.570, 95% CI; 1.130-2.182), and sibling's history of GI cancer (AOR 1.973, 95% CI; 1.246-3.126) remained independently associated with GI cancers.

Conclusions:

GI cancer patients tended to have a first relative with a history of concordant GI cancer. Personal factors (old age and male) and lifestyle (smoking) contribute to the development of GI cancer, independently. Individuals with high risk for GI cancers may be advised to undergo screening at an earlier age.

KEYWORDS:

Gastrointestinal neoplasm; Medical history taking; Risk factors

PMID:
29943561
DOI:
10.4166/kjg.2018.71.6.338
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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