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Nat Genet. 2018 Jul;50(7):951-955. doi: 10.1038/s41588-018-0150-8. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Defining endemic cholera at three levels of spatiotemporal resolution within Bangladesh.

Author information

1
Infection Genomics Programme, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK. daryl.domman@sanger.ac.uk.
2
Infectious Diseases Division, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
3
Infection Genomics Programme, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
5
Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Infection Genomics Programme, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK. nrt@sanger.ac.uk.
10
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. nrt@sanger.ac.uk.

Abstract

Although much focus is placed on cholera epidemics, the greatest burden occurs in settings in which cholera is endemic, including areas of South Asia, Africa and now Haiti1,2. Dhaka, Bangladesh is a megacity that is hyper-endemic for cholera, and experiences two regular seasonal outbreaks of cholera each year3. Despite this, a detailed understanding of the diversity of Vibrio cholerae strains circulating in this setting, and their relationships to annual outbreaks, has not yet been obtained. Here we performed whole-genome sequencing of V. cholerae across several levels of focus and scale, at the maximum possible resolution. We analyzed bacterial isolates to define cholera dynamics at multiple levels, ranging from infection within individuals, to disease dynamics at the household level, to regional and intercontinental cholera transmission. Our analyses provide a genomic framework for understanding cholera diversity and transmission in an endemic setting.

PMID:
29942084
PMCID:
PMC6283067
DOI:
10.1038/s41588-018-0150-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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