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J Am Heart Assoc. 2018 Jun 25;7(13). pii: e008814. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.118.008814.

Tea Consumption and Longitudinal Change in High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentration in Chinese Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA.
2
Department of Nephrology, Kailuan Hospital, Tangshan, China.
3
Department of Cardiology, Kailuan Hospital, Tangshan, China.
4
Department of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.
5
Department of Statistics, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA.
6
Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA.
7
Department of Cardiology, Kailuan Hospital, Tangshan, China xxg14@psu.edu drwusl@163.com.
8
Department of Nutritional Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA xxg14@psu.edu drwusl@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The relation between tea consumption and age-related changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations remains unclear, and longitudinal human data are limited. The aim of current study was to examine the relation between tea intake and longitudinal change in HDL-C concentrations.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Baseline (2006) tea consumption was assessed via a questionnaire, and plasma HDL-C concentrations were measured in 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012 among 80 182 individuals (49±12 years of age) who did not have cardiovascular diseases or cancer, or did not use cholesterol-lowering agents both at baseline (2006) and during the follow-up period (2006-2012). The associations between baseline tea consumption and rate of change in HDL-C concentrations were examined using generalized estimating equation models. Tea consumption was inversely associated with a decreased rate of HDL-C concentrations (P-trend <0.0001) in the fully adjusted model. The adjusted mean difference in the HDL-C decreased rate was 0.010 (95% confidence interval, 0.008, 0.012) mmol/L per year for tea consumers versus nonconsumers (never or less than once/month group). Interactions between tea consumption and age, sex, lifestyle scores, and metabolic syndrome (all P-interaction <0.0001) were identified. The associations between greater tea consumption and slower decrease in HDL-C concentrations were more pronounced in men, individuals aged 60 or older, individuals with a lower lifestyle score, and individuals with metabolic syndrome (all P-trend <0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Tea consumption was associated with slower age-related decreases in HDL-C concentrations during 6 years of follow-up.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION:

URL: www.chictr.org. Unique identifier: ChiCTR-TNRC-11001489.

KEYWORDS:

cardiovascular disease risk factors; catechins; high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol; lipids and lipoproteins; longitudinal cohort study; nutrition; polyphenols

PMID:
29941658
PMCID:
PMC6064891
DOI:
10.1161/JAHA.118.008814
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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