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Free Radic Biol Med. 2018 Aug 20;124:319-327. doi: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2018.06.022. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

C60 fullerene accumulation in human leukemic cells and perspectives of LED-mediated photodynamic therapy.

Author information

1
Division Molecular Biotechnology and Functional Genomics, Technical University of Applied Sciences Wildau, Hochschulring 1, 15745 Wildau, Germany; Dept. of Bioinformatics, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg, Germany; Educational and Scientific Center "Institute of Biology and Medicine", Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Volodymyrska 64, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine.
2
Division Molecular Biotechnology and Functional Genomics, Technical University of Applied Sciences Wildau, Hochschulring 1, 15745 Wildau, Germany.
3
Dept. of Chemistry, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Volodymyrska 64, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine.
4
Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, University of Technology Ilmenau, Weimarer Straße 25 (Curiebau), 98693 Ilmenau, Germany.
5
Educational and Scientific Center "Institute of Biology and Medicine", Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Volodymyrska 64, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine.
6
Dept. of Bioinformatics, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg, Germany.
7
Division Molecular Biotechnology and Functional Genomics, Technical University of Applied Sciences Wildau, Hochschulring 1, 15745 Wildau, Germany. Electronic address: mfrohme@th-wildau.de.

Abstract

Recent progress in nanobiotechnology has attracted interest to a biomedical application of the carbon nanostructure C60 fullerene since it possesses a unique structure and versatile biological activity. C60 fullerene potential application in the frame of cancer photodynamic therapy (PDT) relies on rapid development of new light sources as well as on better understanding of the fullerene interaction with cells. The aim of this study was to analyze C60 fullerene effects on human leukemic cells (CCRF-CEM) in combination with high power single chip light-emitting diodes (LEDs) light irradiation of different wavelengths: ultraviolet (UV, 365 nm), violet (405 nm), green (515 nm) and red (632 nm). The time-dependent accumulation of fullerene C60 in CCRF-CEM cells up to 250 ng/106 cells at 24 h with predominant localization within mitochondria was demonstrated with immunocytochemical staining and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. In a cell viability assay we studied photoexcitation of the accumulated C60 nanostructures with ultraviolet or violet LEDs and could prove that significant phototoxic effects did arise. A less pronounced C60 fullerene phototoxic effect was observed after irradiation with green, and no effect was detected with red light. A C60 fullerene photoactivation with violet light induced substantial ROS generation and apoptotic cell death, confirmed by caspase3/7 activation and plasma membrane phosphatidylserine externalization. Our work proved C60 fullerene ability to induce apoptosis of leukemic cells after photoexcitation with high power single chip 405 nm LED as a light source. This underlined the potential for application of C60 nanostructure as a photosensitizer for anticancer therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Apoptosis; C(60) fullerene; HPLC-ESI-MS; Immunocytochemistry; LEDs; Leukemic cells; Photodanamic therapy

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