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PLoS One. 2018 Jun 25;13(6):e0199656. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199656. eCollection 2018.

Health-related quality of life in intensive care survivors: Associations with social support, comorbidity, and pain interference.

Author information

1
Department of Research and Development, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
2
Department of Post-operative and Critical Care, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
3
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
4
Institute of Health and Society, Department of Nursing science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
5
Faculty of Health Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
6
Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
7
Department of Pain Management and Research, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Experiences during a stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), including pain, delirium, physical deterioration, and the critical illness itself, may all influence survivors' health-related quality of life (HRQOL). However, few studies have examined the influence of social support, comorbidity, and pain interference on ICU survivors' HRQOL.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate possible associations between social support, number of comorbidities, and pain interference on HRQOL in ICU survivors.

METHODS:

ICU survivors responded to a survey 3 months (n = 118) and 1 year (n = 89) after ICU discharge. HRQOL was measured using the Short Form Health Survey-12 (v1), social support using the revised Social Provision Scale, pain interference using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, and comorbidities using the Self-Administered Comorbidity Questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Physical and mental HRQOL were reduced at both 3 months and 1 year in ICU survivors compared with the general population. This reduction was more pronounced at 3 months for physical HRQOL, while a small reduction in mental HRQOL was not clinically relevant. Social support was statistical significantly positively associated with mental HRQOL at 3 months, while number of comorbidities was statistical significantly associated with a reduction in physical HRQOL at 3 months and 1 year and mental HRQOL at 1 year. Lastly pain interference was significantly associated with a reduction in physical HRQOL at 3 months and 1 year.

CONCLUSIONS:

ICU survivors primarily report reduced physical HRQOL. Social support was positively associated with mental HRQOL, while number of comorbidities, and pain interference were all significantly associated with a reduction in HRQOL. Pain interference was associated with the largest reduction in HRQOL.

PMID:
29940026
PMCID:
PMC6016908
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0199656
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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