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Cell Metab. 2018 Aug 7;28(2):289-299.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2018.05.029. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

Evidence for a Non-leptin System that Defends against Weight Gain in Overfeeding.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, Columbia University, 1150 St. Nicholas Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, Columbia University, 1150 St. Nicholas Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, Columbia University, 1150 St. Nicholas Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: awf7@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

Weight is defended so that increases or decreases in body mass elicit responses that favor restoration of one's previous weight. While much is known about the signals that respond to weight loss and the central role that leptin plays, the lack of experimental systems studying the overfed state has meant little is known about pathways defending against weight gain. We developed a system to study this physiology and found that overfed mice defend against increased weight gain with graded anorexia but, unlike weight loss, this response is independent of circulating leptin concentration. In overfed mice that are unresponsive to orexigenic stimuli, adipose tissue is transcriptionally and immunologically distinct from fat of ad libitum-fed obese animals. These findings provide evidence that overfeeding-induced obesity alters adipose tissue and central responses in ways that are distinct from ad libitum obesity and activates a non-leptin system to defend against weight gain.

KEYWORDS:

adipose tissue; leptin; obesity; weight regulation

PMID:
29937378
PMCID:
PMC6082718
[Available on 2019-08-07]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2018.05.029

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