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Front Med. 2018 Jun 23. doi: 10.1007/s11684-017-0579-7. [Epub ahead of print]

White blood cell count and the incidence of hyperuricemia: insights from a community-based study.

Liu J1,2, Shen P1,2, Ma X1,2, Yu X1,2, Ni L1,2, Hao X1,2, Wang W3,4, Chen N1,2.

Author information

1
Department of Nephrology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025, China.
2
Institute of Nephrology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025, China.
3
Department of Nephrology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025, China. wweiming01@126.com.
4
Institute of Nephrology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025, China. wweiming01@126.com.

Abstract

Hyperuricemia (HUA) is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The relationship between HUA and white blood cell (WBC) count remains unknown. A sampling survey for CKD was conducted in Sanlin community in 2012 and 2014. CKD was defined as proteinuria in at least the microalbuminuric stage or an estimated GFR of 60 mL/(min∙1.73 m2). HUA was defined as serum uric acid > 420 μmol/L in men and > 360 μmol/L in women. This study included 1024 participants. The prevalence of HUAwas 17.77%. Patients with HUA were more likely to have higher levels of WBC count, which was positively associated with HUA prevalence. This association was also observed in participants without CKD, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or obesity. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that WBC count was independently associated with the risk for HUA in male and female participants. Compared with participants without HUA, inflammatory factors such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin 6 increased in participants with HUA. Hence, WBC count is positively associated with HUA, and this association is independent of conventional risk factors for CKD.

KEYWORDS:

chronic kidney disease; hyperuricemia; inflammation; white blood cell count

PMID:
29936636
DOI:
10.1007/s11684-017-0579-7

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