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Chemosphere. 2018 Oct;209:373-380. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.06.056. Epub 2018 Jun 14.

Exploration of ToxCast/Tox21 bioassays as candidate bioanalytical tools for measuring groups of chemicals in water.

Author information

1
KWR Watercycle Research Institute, Groningenhaven 7, 3433 PE, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. Electronic address: jochem.louisse@wur.nl.
2
KWR Watercycle Research Institute, Groningenhaven 7, 3433 PE, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands.
3
KWR Watercycle Research Institute, Groningenhaven 7, 3433 PE, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands; Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
4
Vitens Drinking Water Company, 8019 BE, Zwolle, the Netherlands.

Abstract

The present study explores the ToxCast/Tox21 database to select candidate bioassays as bioanalytical tools for measuring groups of chemicals in water. To this aim, the ToxCast/Tox21 database was explored for bioassays that detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic amines (AAs), (chloro)phenols ((C)Ps) and halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAliHs), which are included in the European and/or Dutch Drinking Water Directives. Based on the analysis of the availability and performance of bioassays included in the database, we concluded that several bioassays are suitable as bioanalytical tools for assessing the presence of PAHs and (C)Ps in drinking water sources. No bioassays were identified for AAs and HAliHs, due to the limited activity of these chemicals and/or the limited amount of data on these chemicals in the database. A series of bioassays was selected that measure molecular or cellular effects that are covered by bioassays currently in use for chemical water quality monitoring. Interestingly, also bioassays were selected that represent molecular or cellular effects that are not covered by bioassays currently applied. The usefulness of these newly identified bioassays as bioanalytical tools should be further evaluated in follow-up studies. Altogether, this study shows how exploration of the ToxCast/Tox21 database provides a series of candidate bioassays as bioanalytical tools for measuring groups of chemicals in water. This assessment can be performed for any group of chemicals of interest (if represented in the database), and may provide candidate bioassays that can be used to complement the currently applied bioassays for chemical water quality assessment.

KEYWORDS:

Bioanalytical tools; Bioassay; Chemical water quality; Groups of chemicals; Tox21; ToxCast

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