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Med Clin North Am. 2018 Jul;102(4):603-620. doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2018.02.015.

Addressing Adolescents' and Young Adults' Substance Use Disorders.

Author information

1
Adolescent Substance Use and Addiction Program, Division of Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: nicholas.chadi@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, 88 East Newton Street, Vose Hall Room 322, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center, Grayken Center for Addiction, 850 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Grayken Center for Addiction, 850 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118, USA.
3
Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, 88 East Newton Street, Vose Hall Room 322, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

Abstract

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) have unique needs and important biopsychosocial differences when compared with older adults who use substances. As their brains continue to develop, youth are especially susceptible to the reinforcing effects of substances in the context of a still-developing capacity for executive control and decision making. In this article, the authors highlight key differences in the neurobiologic, epidemiologic, and relational aspects of substance use found in AYA. They also discuss how best to engage with youth who use substances and how prevention and intervention can be adapted for optimal effectiveness for this distinct and high-risk population.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Intervention; Prevention; Substance use disorders; Young adults

PMID:
29933818
DOI:
10.1016/j.mcna.2018.02.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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