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Neurobiol Aging. 2018 Sep;69:274-282. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.05.029. Epub 2018 May 31.

Longitudinal serum S100β and brain aging in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936.

Author information

1
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. Electronic address: simon.cox@ed.ac.uk.
2
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
3
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; UK Dementia Research Institute at The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
4
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; Medical Genetics Section, University of Edinburgh Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine and MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK.
5
Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences University of Glasgow, UK.
6
Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
7
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; Department of Computer Science, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria.
8
Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; UK Dementia Research Institute at The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
9
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
10
Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, King's College London, London, UK.
11
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
12
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK; Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.

Abstract

Elevated serum and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of S100β, a protein predominantly found in glia, are associated with intracranial injury and neurodegeneration, although concentrations are also influenced by several other factors. The longitudinal association between serum S100β concentrations and brain health in nonpathological aging is unknown. In a large group (baseline N = 593; longitudinal N = 414) of community-dwelling older adults at ages 73 and 76 years, we examined cross-sectional and parallel longitudinal changes between serum S100β and brain MRI parameters: white matter hyperintensities, perivascular space visibility, white matter fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity (MD), global atrophy, and gray matter volume. Using bivariate change score structural equation models, correcting for age, sex, diabetes, and hypertension, higher S100β was cross-sectionally associated with poorer general fractional anisotropy (r = -0.150, p = 0.001), which was strongest in the anterior thalamic (r = -0.155, p < 0.001) and cingulum bundles (r = -0.111, p = 0.005), and survived false discovery rate correction. Longitudinally, there were no significant associations between changes in brain imaging parameters and S100β after false discovery rate correction. These data provide some weak evidence that S100β may be an informative biomarker of brain white matter aging.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Longitudinal; S100β; Small vessel disease; White matter

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