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Cureus. 2018 Apr 20;10(4):e2511. doi: 10.7759/cureus.2511.

Post Vaccination Guillain Barre Syndrome: A Case Report.

Author information

1
Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA.
2
Internal Medicine, Ziauddin Medical University, Karachi, PAK.
3
Internal Medicine, Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences (duhs), Karachi, PAK.

Abstract

Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare but fatal autoimmune disease. The exact cause of Guillain-Barre syndrome is still unknown. The most common known etiology of Guillain-Barre syndrome is infectious disease notably caused by Campylobacter jejuni. A very small fraction of people can develop Guillain-Barre syndrome due to vaccines and vaccinations like a meningococcal vaccine, poliovirus vaccine, influenza vaccine, and rabies vaccine. Of all these, rabies is fatal invariably. It can be preventable if diagnosed early and post-exposure treatment is followed according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Older formulations of rabies vaccines are cultured in the neural tissues and have been found to have an increased risk of Guillain-Barre syndrome. Although less immunogenic older formulations of rabies vaccines are more commonly used in Asian and South American countries due to their cost-effective nature. There is little to no data available on the incidence of Guillain-Barre syndrome due to vaccinations in Pakistan. Most of the cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome due to vaccination are either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. In this case report, we are presenting a case of vaccine-associated Guillain-Barre syndrome due to neural tissue anti-rabies vaccine in a young girl, who presented with lower limb weakness, inability to pass urine and abdominal pain.

KEYWORDS:

guillain-barré syndrome (gbs); healthcare improvement; post vaccination guillain-barre syndrome; preventive medicine; primary health; rabies vaccination

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

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