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Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018 Oct;161:526-533. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.06.033. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Metal-immobilizing Serratia liquefaciens CL-1 and Bacillus thuringiensis X30 increase biomass and reduce heavy metal accumulation of radish under field conditions.

Author information

1
College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Key Laboratory of Agricultural and Environmental Microbiology, Ministry of Agriculture, Nanjing 210095, PR China.
2
College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Key Laboratory of Agricultural and Environmental Microbiology, Ministry of Agriculture, Nanjing 210095, PR China. Electronic address: xfsheng@njau.edu.cn.

Abstract

In this study, metal-tolerant bacteria Serratia liquefaciens CL-1 and Bacillus thuringiensis X30 were compared for their Cd and Pb immobilization in solution and impacts on biomass and Cd and Pb uptake in a radish in metal-contaminated soils under field conditions. Strains CL-1 and X30 significantly reduced water-soluble Cd and Pb concentrations (45-67%) and increased the pH in solution compared to the controls. These strains significantly increased the biomass (25-99%) and decreased edible tissue Cd and Pb uptake in the radish (37-81%) and DTPA-extractable Cd and Pb contents (18-44%) of the rhizosphere soil compared to the un-inoculated controls. Strain CL-1 had higher potential to reduce edible tissue Cd and Pb uptake in the radish and DTPA-extractable Cd content than strain X30. Also, these strains significantly increased Cd translocation factor and strain CL-1 also significantly increased Pb translocation factor of the radish. Furthermore, strain CL-1 significantly increased the ratio of small soil aggregates (< 0.25 mm and 0.25-0.50 mm) of the rhizosphere soil. The results showed that these strains reduced the edible tissue Cd and Pb uptake through decreasing Cd and Pb availability in the soil and increasing Cd or Pb translocation from the roots to the leaves of the radish. The results also suggested the bacteria-related differences in reduced heavy metal uptake in the radish and the mechanisms involved under field conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Cd and Pb uptake of radish; Heavy metal immobilization; Metal-contaminated soil; Metal-tolerant bacteria; Radish

PMID:
29929128
DOI:
10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.06.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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