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Eur Radiol. 2019 Jan;29(1):115-123. doi: 10.1007/s00330-018-5576-y. Epub 2018 Jun 20.

Abnormal corpus callosum induced by diabetes impairs sensorimotor connectivity in patients after acute stroke.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, No.88 Jiefang Road, Shangcheng District, Hangzhou, 310009, China.
2
Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
3
Department of Psychiatry, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering and Instrument Science, Key Laboratory for Biomedical Engineering of Education Ministry of China, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
5
Department of Neurology, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China.
6
Department of Neurology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
7
Department of Radiology, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, No.88 Jiefang Road, Shangcheng District, Hangzhou, 310009, China. zhangminming@zju.edu.cn.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To test the hypothesis that abnormal corpus callosum (CC) induced by diabetes may impair inter-hemispheric sensorimotor functional connectivity (FC) that is associated with poor clinical outcome after stroke.

METHODS:

Forty-five patients with acute ischaemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory and 14 normal controls participated in the study. CC was divided into five subregions on three-dimensional T1-weighted image. The microstructural integrity of each subregion of CC was analysed by DTI and the inter-hemispheric FCs in primary motor cortex (M1-M1 FC) and primary sensory cortex (S1-S1 FC) were examined by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

RESULTS:

Diabetic patients (n = 26) had significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in the isthmus of CC (CCisthmus) when compared with non-diabetic patients (n = 19) and normal controls (p < 0.0001). In addition, diabetic patients had the lowest M1-M1 FC (p = 0.015) and S1-S1 FC (p = 0.001). In diabetic patients, reduced FA of CCisthmus correlated with decreased M1-M1 FC (r = 0.549, p = 0.004) and S1-S1 FC (r = 0.507, p = 0.008). Decreased M1-M1 FC was independently associated with poor outcome after stroke in patients with diabetes (odds ratio = 0.448, p = 0.017).

CONCLUSIONS:

CC degeneration induced by diabetes impairs sensorimotor connectivity and dysfunction of motor connectivity can contribute to poor recovery after stroke in patients with diabetes.

KEY POINTS:

• Abnormal isthmus of corpus callosum in stroke patients with diabetes. • Abnormal isthmus of corpus callosum correlated with decreased inter-hemispheric sensorimotor connectivity. • Decreased motor connectivity correlated with poor stroke outcome in diabetic patients.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebral cortex; Diabetes mellitus; Magnetic resonance imaging; Stroke; White matter

PMID:
29926208
DOI:
10.1007/s00330-018-5576-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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