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Pediatr Transplant. 2018 Jun 19:e13249. doi: 10.1111/petr.13249. [Epub ahead of print]

Comparison of survival outcome between donor types or stem cell sources for childhood acute myeloid leukemia after allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A multicenter retrospective study of Study Alliance of Yeungnam Pediatric Hematology-oncology.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Keimyung University School of Medicine and Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, Korea.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Pusan National University Children's Hospital, Yangsan, Korea.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju, Korea.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
9
Department of Pediatrics, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan, Korea.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan, Korea.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan, Korea.

Abstract

We compared transplant outcomes between donor types and stem cell sources for childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The medical records of children with AML in the Yeungnam region of Korea from January 2000 to June 2017 were reviewed. In all, 76 children with AML (male-to-female ratio = 46:30) received allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In total, 29 patients received HSCT from either a matched-related donor or a mismatched-related donor, 32 patients received an unrelated donor, and 15 patients received umbilical cord blood. In term of stem cell sources, bone marrow was used in 15 patients and peripheral blood in 46 patients. For all HSCT cases, the 5-year overall survival (OS) was 73.1% (95% CI: 62.7-83.5) and the 5-year event-free survival (EFS) was 66.1% (95% CI: 54.5-77.7). There was no statistical difference in 5-year OS according to the donor types or stem cell sources (P = .869 and P = .911). There was no statistical difference in 5-year EFS between donor types or stem cell sources (P = .526 and P = .478). For all HSCT cases, the 5-year relapse rate was 16.1% (95% CI: 7.3-24.9) and the 5-year non-relapse mortality (NRM) was 13.3% (95% CI: 5.1-21.5). There was no statistical difference in the 5-year relapse rate according to the donor types or stem cell sources (P = .971 and P = .965). There was no statistical difference in the 5-year NRM between donor types or stem cell sources (P = .461 and P = .470).

KEYWORDS:

acute myeloid leukemia; children; umbilical cord blood; unrelated donor

PMID:
29923253
DOI:
10.1111/petr.13249

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