Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 Jun 19;8(1):9369. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-27577-w.

Inhibition of the substantia nigra pars reticulata produces divergent effects on sensorimotor gating in rats and monkeys.

Author information

1
Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, Georgetown University, Washington DC, 20057, USA.
2
Department of Pharmacology & Physiology, Georgetown University, Washington DC, 20057, USA.
3
Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, Georgetown University, Washington DC, 20057, USA. paf22@georgetown.edu.
4
Department of Pharmacology & Physiology, Georgetown University, Washington DC, 20057, USA. paf22@georgetown.edu.
5
Department of Neuroscience, Georgetown University, Washington DC, 20057, USA. paf22@georgetown.edu.
6
Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, Georgetown University, Washington DC, 20057, USA. malkoval@georgetown.edu.
7
Department of Pharmacology & Physiology, Georgetown University, Washington DC, 20057, USA. malkoval@georgetown.edu.

Abstract

The basal ganglia are an evolutionarily old group of structures, with gross organization conserved across species. Despite this conservation, there is evidence suggesting that anatomical organization of a key output nucleus of the basal ganglia, the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr), diverges across species. Nevertheless, there are relatively few comparative studies examining the impact of manipulations of SNpr across species. Here, we evaluated the role of SNpr in a highly conserved behavior: prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). We performed parallel experiments in both rats and rhesus macaques using intracranial microinfusions of GABAA agonist muscimol to investigate the role of SNpr in PPI. SNpr inactivation significantly disrupted PPI in rats, congruent with prior studies; however, in macaques, SNpr inactivation resulted in facilitation of PPI. We suggest that this difference in circuit function results from a divergence in anatomical connectivity, underscoring the importance of circuit dissection studies across species.

PMID:
29921848
PMCID:
PMC6008324
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-27577-w
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center