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Sci Signal. 2018 Jun 19;11(535). pii: eaao2060. doi: 10.1126/scisignal.aao2060.

Inhibition of somatosensory mechanotransduction by annexin A6.

Author information

1
Molecular Nociception Group, Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, University College London (UCL), Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.
2
Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK.
3
Department of Biomedical Science, The University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK.
4
Institute of Ophthalmology, UCL, 11-43 Bath Street, London EC1V 9EL, UK.
5
Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia.
6
Department of Infectious Diseases, King's College London School of Medicine, London SE1 9RT, UK.
7
Molecular Nociception Group, Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, University College London (UCL), Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK. j.wood@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Mechanically activated, slowly adapting currents in sensory neurons have been linked to noxious mechanosensation. The conotoxin NMB-1 (noxious mechanosensation blocker-1) blocks such currents and inhibits mechanical pain. Using a biotinylated form of NMB-1 in mass spectrometry analysis, we identified 67 binding proteins in sensory neurons and a sensory neuron-derived cell line, of which the top candidate was annexin A6, a membrane-associated calcium-binding protein. Annexin A6-deficient mice showed increased sensitivity to mechanical stimuli. Sensory neurons from these mice showed increased activity of the cation channel Piezo2, which mediates a rapidly adapting mechano-gated current linked to proprioception and touch, and a decrease in mechanically activated, slowly adapting currents. Conversely, overexpression of annexin A6 in sensory neurons inhibited rapidly adapting currents that were partially mediated by Piezo2. Furthermore, overexpression of annexin A6 in sensory neurons attenuated mechanical pain in a mouse model of osteoarthritis, a disease in which mechanically evoked pain is particularly problematic. These data suggest that annexin A6 can be exploited to inhibit chronic mechanical pain.

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