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Magnesium and stress.

Editors

In: Vink R1, Nechifor M2, editors.

Source

Magnesium in the Central Nervous System [Internet]. Adelaide (AU): University of Adelaide Press; 2011.

Author information

1
Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology & Adelaide Centre for Neuroscience Research, School of Medical Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
2
Department of Pharmacology, “Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iasi, Romania
3
Department of Pharmacology, “Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iasi, 700115, Romania.
4
Centre for Neuroscience Research, School of Medical Sciences, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia.

Excerpt

Magnesium status is highly associated with stress levels, with both stress and hypomagnesemia potentiating each other’s negative effects. Indeed, hypomagnesemia has been associated with stressful conditions such as photosensitive headache, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, audiogenic stress, cold stress, and physical stress, amongst others. The role of magnesium in these conditions is unclear, although a number of potential mechanisms for magnesium’s action have been identified including via the glutamatergic, serotonergic, and adrenergic neurotransmitter systems, as well as via several neuro- hormones. The current review examines the link between magnesium deficiency and stress, focusing on the association between magnesium and various stress pathologies, magnesium’s potential interaction with stress pathways, and magnesium’s effects on the brain.

© 2011 The Authors.

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