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Lancet Infect Dis. 2018 Oct;18(10):e295-e311. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30292-5. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

The respiratory syncytial virus vaccine landscape: lessons from the graveyard and promising candidates.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; Department of Paediatrics, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
2
Center for Vaccine Innovation and Access, PATH, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit and Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation: Vaccine Preventable Diseases, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands.
4
Centro Nacional de Microbiología and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.
5
Department of Paediatrics, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
6
Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
7
Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
8
National Heart and Lung Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London, UK.
9
Department of Molecular Biosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.
10
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.
11
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Center for Vaccines and Immunity at Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; Departamento de Farmacología y Pediatria, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Malaga, Malaga, Spain.
12
Center for Immunization Research, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
13
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA; Department of Epidemiology Center for Global Health, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO, USA.
14
Norms and Standards for Biologicals, Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
15
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Center for Vaccines and Immunity at Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
16
Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Molecular Biosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, and Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
17
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands.
18
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; Department of Medicine, University of Rochester and Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY, USA.
19
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
20
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; Julius Clinical, Zeist, Netherlands.
21
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; MRC-Asthma UK Centre in Allergic Mechanisms of Asthma, School of Life Course Sciences, King's College London, London, UK.
22
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; Women's and Children's Health Department, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
23
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; Allergy Department, 2nd Paediatric Clinic, National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Division of Infection, Immunity & Respiratory Medicine, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
24
Initiative for Vaccine Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
25
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; Fundacion INFANT, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
26
Licensing Division, Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), London, UK.
27
Mahatma Gandhi Tribal Hospital, Karmagram, Utavali, Tahsil, Dharni, India.
28
Department of Medicine, University of Rochester and Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY, USA.
29
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands; Pontificia Universidade Católica RGS (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, Brazil.
30
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
31
Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; Department of Paediatrics, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network (ReSViNET) Foundation, Zeist, Netherlands. Electronic address: l.bont@umcutrecht.nl.

Erratum in

Abstract

The global burden of disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is increasingly recognised, not only in infants, but also in older adults (aged ≥65 years). Advances in knowledge of the structural biology of the RSV surface fusion glycoprotein have revolutionised RSV vaccine development by providing a new target for preventive interventions. The RSV vaccine landscape has rapidly expanded to include 19 vaccine candidates and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in clinical trials, reflecting the urgency of reducing this global health problem and hence the prioritisation of RSV vaccine development. The candidates include mAbs and vaccines using four approaches: (1) particle-based, (2) live-attenuated or chimeric, (3) subunit, (4) vector-based. Late-phase RSV vaccine trial failures highlight gaps in knowledge regarding immunological protection and provide lessons for future development. In this Review, we highlight promising new approaches for RSV vaccine design and provide a comprehensive overview of RSV vaccine candidates and mAbs in clinical development to prevent one of the most common and severe infectious diseases in young children and older adults worldwide.

PMID:
29914800
DOI:
10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30292-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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