Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2018 Jun 18;13(6):e0198974. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0198974. eCollection 2018.

Mediterranean diet and quality of life: Baseline cross-sectional analysis of the PREDIMED-PLUS trial.

Author information

1
Atención Primaria. Osasunbidea-Servicio Navarro de Salud. Pamplona, Spain.
2
CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERobn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra-IdiSNA, Pamplona, Spain.
4
Human Nutrition Unit, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Reus, Spain.
5
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
6
Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition, IMIM-Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain.
7
Blanquerna School of Life Sciences, Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain.
8
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBEResp), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain.
9
Nuritional Epidemiology Unit, Miguel Hernandez University, ISABIAL-FISABIO, Alicante, Spain.
10
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Physiology and Toxicology, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
11
Health Research Institute of the Balearic Islands (IdISBa), University Hospital Son Espases, Palma, Spain.
12
School of Nursing, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain.
13
Department of Internal Medicine, Reina Sofia University Hospital, University of Córdoba-IMIBIC, Córdoba, Spain.
14
Department of Internal Medicine, IDIBAPS, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
15
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
16
Department of Cardiology OSI ARABA. University Hospital Araba, Vitoria, Spain.
17
University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz. Spain.
18
Department of Endocrinology, University Hospital, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain.
19
Institute for Biomedical Research, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain.
20
Instituto de Biomedicina (IBIOMED); Universidad de León, León, Spain.
21
Department of Family Medicine, Distrito Sanitario Atencion Primaria, Centro de Salud Las Palmeritas, Sevilla, Spain.
22
Department of Endocrinology, Fundación Jiménez-Díaz, Madrid, Spain.
23
Lipids and Vascular Risk Unit, Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
24
CIBER Diabetes y enfermedades metabólicas (CIBERdem), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain.
25
Department of Endocrinology, IDIBAPS, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
26
Nutritional Genomics and Epigenomics Group, IMDEA Food, CEI UAM + CSIC, Madrid, Spain.
27
Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Jaén, Jaén, Spain.
28
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
29
Lipids and Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit, Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain.
30
Lipid Clinic, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain.
31
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, United State of America.

Abstract

We assessed if a 17-item score capturing adherence to a traditional Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) was associated with better health-related quality of life among older Spanish men and women with overweight or obesity harboring the metabolic syndrome. We analyzed baseline data from 6430 men and women (age 55-70 years) participating in the PREDIMED-Plus study. PREDIMED-Plus is a multi-centre randomized trial testing an energy-restricted MedDiet combined with promotion of physical activity and behavioral therapy for primary cardiovascular prevention compared to a MedDiet alone. Participants answered a 36-item questionnaire about health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and a 17-item questionnaire that assessed adherence to an MedDiet. We used ANCOVA and multivariable-adjusted linear regression models to compare baseline adjusted means of the quality of life scales according to categories of adherence to the MedDiet. Higher adherence to the MedDiet was independently associated with significantly better scores in the eight dimensions of HRQoL. Adjusted differences of > = 3 points between the highest and the lowest dietary adherence groups to the MedDiet were observed for vitality, emotional role, and mental health and of > = 2 points for the other dimensions. In conclusion, this study shows a positive association between adherence to a MedDiet and several dimensions of quality of life.

PMID:
29912978
PMCID:
PMC6005498
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0198974
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center