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Chemosphere. 2018 Oct;209:20-27. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.06.062. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Impacts of nonpoint source pollutants on microbial community in rain gardens.

Author information

1
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Kongju National University, 1223-24 Cheonan-daero Seobukgu, Cheonan city, Chungnamdo, 31080, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Kongju National University, 1223-24 Cheonan-daero Seobukgu, Cheonan city, Chungnamdo, 31080, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: leehyung@kongju.ac.kr.

Abstract

Low-impact development (LID) techniques are being applied to reduce non-point source (NPS) pollution which are generated from various land uses. Cost-effective LID design requires consideration of influent runoff properties as well as physical and ecological pollutant-removing mechanisms. However, current LID technology design has failed to reflect the different properties of influent water from various land uses, and the biological design factors in LID facilities causing low efficiency and difficulties in maintenance. This study was conducted to identify biological design factors by analyzing the impact of the pollutants included in influent runoff and physical environment on microbial growth in rain garden facilities applied to different land uses. The results showed that the non-point source pollutant loadings were about 1.5-3 times higher in the runoff from parking lots, which are frequently visited by automobiles than in roof runoff. Type of soil, chemical species, and chemical composition were assessed as internal environmental factors having significant impact on the phylum and the count of microorganisms in the facilities. The growth of Cyanobacteria, Streptophyta, Chlorophyta, Bacillariophyta, and Xanthophyceae was good when there was appropriate water content in the soil, light, and sandy soil. Based on these results, the future design of rain garden facilities should be performed by considering a microorganism appropriate to the properties of the influent pollutants, determining appropriate water content, nutrient content and soil type, and choosing plants that contribute to microbial growth.

KEYWORDS:

Influent runoff; Microbial distribution; Non-point source pollutants; Rain garden

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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