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BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 Jun 15;18(1):454. doi: 10.1186/s12913-018-3247-y.

How do patient demographics, time-related variables, reasons for cancellation, and clinical procedures affect frequency of same-day operating room surgery cancelation? A maximum likelihood method.

Author information

1
Department of Health Systems & Quality Management, College of Public Health & Health Informatics, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. daaro@ksau-hs.edu.sa.
2
Graduate School of Professional Studies, St. Mary's University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. daaro@ksau-hs.edu.sa.
3
King Fahad Hospital, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cancelation of same-day surgery is a common global problem, wasting valuable hospitals' operating room (OR) times and imposing significant economic costs. There is limited evidence to support the association between frequency of same-day surgery cancelation and patient demographics, time-related variables, healthcare provider reasons for cancelation, and clinical procedures in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to explore this relationship, providing an understanding of the local context.

METHODS:

A retrospective cross-sectional study that retrieved medical records to examine the association between the frequency of same-day surgery cancelation and covariates including patient demographics, time-related variables, healthcare provider reason for cancelation, and clinical procedures. The data covered from January 2014 to December 2014 at King Fahad National Guard Hospital in Riyadh. We considered 440 patients that met the inclusion criteria for final analysis. The cancelation was regarded less frequent if a patient canceled once in the12 months and more frequent if a patient canceled two times or more in the same period. We used descriptive statistics to summarize data and employed a probit regression to estimate the association of frequency of same-day surgery cancelation and covariates via maximum likelihood method. King Abdullah International Medical Research Center granted the institutional approval.

RESULTS:

Our study suggests that while reasons of unavailability of OR time were associated with less frequent same-day surgery cancelation, scheduling issues were linked to more frequent cancelations, compared with reasons for patients being unwell on the day of surgery. Waiting time of more than six hours and morning sessions were associated with less frequent cancelations compared to shorter waiting time and afternoon sessions. Compared to general procedures, specialized clinical procedures were associated with cancelations that are more frequent. Further, female patients were more likely to have more cancelations. Finally, being married was associated with the less frequent cancelation of same-day surgery.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings provide evidence of determinants of the frequency of same-day surgery cancelations. This study draws several important implications for hospitals, especially on optimal utilization of resources and minimization of same-day surgery cancellations. The study also offers several recommendations that we believe will spur future research.

KEYWORDS:

Frequency of cancelation; Probit regression; Same-day surgery cancelation; Saudi Arabia

PMID:
29903002
PMCID:
PMC6003070
DOI:
10.1186/s12913-018-3247-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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