Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Dent Hyg. 2018 Nov;16(4):484-491. doi: 10.1111/idh.12350. Epub 2018 Jun 14.

The association between periodontal disease severity and metabolic syndrome in Vietnamese patients.

Author information

1
Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Odonto-Stomatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association between periodontal disease severity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a group of Vietnamese patients.

METHODS:

A total of 412 participants (114 males, 298 females, average age 57.8 ± 5.7 years) including 206 patients with MetS and 206 participants without MetS were selected for this study. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, dental behaviours and smoking status was collected from a self-administrated questionnaire. Periodontal status including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI) pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) was recorded. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between severity of periodontal disease and MetS with adjustments for related confounders.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of moderate and severe periodontitis assessed by GI, PD and CAL was all significantly higher in the MetS group than in the control group and was significantly increased by a number of MetS components. Logistic regression, adjusted for confounders, showed that people with mean PI ≥2.51 or GI ≥1.01 or number of teeth with bleeding on probing of ≥20 teeth or PD ≥3.66 or CAL ≥3.66 showed a significant association with greater OR for MetS compared to counterparts (P < .05). The OR for MetS was 4.06 (95% CI 2.11-7.84) in severe periodontitis patients compared to non-periodontitis participants (P < .001).

CONCLUSION:

Much severe and extensive periodontal disease was found in MetS participants and increased with number of MetS components. Participants with higher periodontal parameters had a higher risk of MetS.

KEYWORDS:

Vietnamese; metabolic syndrome; periodontal disease

PMID:
29900658
DOI:
10.1111/idh.12350

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center