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J Bone Metab. 2018 May;25(2):99-106. doi: 10.11005/jbm.2018.25.2.99. Epub 2018 May 31.

Is Sarcopenia a Potential Risk Factor for Distal Radius Fracture? Analysis Using Propensity Score Matching.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bundang CHA Medical Center, CHA University School of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea.

Abstract

Background:

Cases of low-energy-induced distal radius fracture (DRF) are increasing. Sarcopenia is considered to be an independent risk factor for fragility fractures. We compared body appendicular lean muscle mass (ALM) and bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with DRF and a comparable control population. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between skeletal muscle mass and DRF.

Methods:

We performed a retrospective review of patients diagnosed with fragility DRF. The DRF group included 87 patients treated at our institute. The control group comprised data for 87 individuals in the general population from among 2,124 selected using nearest-neighbor propensity scoring, based on age, weight, height, and body mass index. All medical conditions and past history were also compared between the two groups.

Results:

The relative overall ALM, combining arm and leg lean body mass divided by height squared, was not significantly different (DRF group, 6.093 kg/m2; controls, 5.945 kg/m2). T-score, a parameter of BMD, was significantly different between groups (DRF, -2.42; controls, -2.05). The proportion of patients with osteoporosis was significantly different (DRF, 44 [50.6%] vs. control, 29 [33.3%], respectively).

Conclusions:

Patients with DRF did not have significantly lower average lean body mass. BMD was significantly lower in patients with DRF than in controls.

KEYWORDS:

Osteoporosis; Osteoporotic fractures; Radius fractures; Risk factors; Sarcopenia

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