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Clin Microbiol Rev. 2018 Jun 13;31(3). pii: e00085-17. doi: 10.1128/CMR.00085-17. Print 2018 Jul.

Proteus spp. as Putative Gastrointestinal Pathogens.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
2
Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Department of Gastroenterology, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia mkamm@unimelb.edu.au.
4
Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Institute of Digestive Disease, State Key Laboratory of Digestive Disease, Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
5
The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.

Abstract

Proteus species, members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, are usually considered commensals in the gut and are most commonly recognized clinically as a cause of urinary tract infections. However, the recent identification of Proteus spp. as potential pathogens in Crohn's disease recurrence after intestinal resection serves as a stimulus to examine their potential role as gut pathogens. Proteus species possess many virulence factors potentially relevant to gastrointestinal pathogenicity, including motility; adherence; the production of urease, hemolysins, and IgA proteases; and the ability to acquire antibiotic resistance. Gastrointestinal conditions that have been linked to Proteus include gastroenteritis (spontaneous and foodborne), nosocomial infections, appendicitis, colonization of devices such as nasogastric tubes, and Crohn's disease. The association of Proteus species with Crohn's disease was particularly strong. Proteus species are low-abundance commensals of the human gut that harbor significant pathogenic potential; further investigation is needed.

KEYWORDS:

Crohn's disease; Enterobacteriaceae; Proteus; bacteriology; gastrointestinal disease; infections; inflammatory bowel disease

PMID:
29899011
PMCID:
PMC6056842
[Available on 2019-06-13]
DOI:
10.1128/CMR.00085-17
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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