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BMJ. 2018 Jun 13;361:k2340. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k2340.

Dietary carbohydrates: role of quality and quantity in chronic disease.

Author information

1
New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA david.ludwig@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
4
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston.
5
Department of Physiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
6
Charles Perkins Centre, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
PMID:
29898880
PMCID:
PMC5996878
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.k2340
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: We have read and understood BMJ policy on declaration of interests and declare the following interests: DSL received research grants (to Boston Children’s Hospital) from the National Institutes of Health, Nutrition Science Initiative, the Laura and John Arnold Foundation and other philanthropic organisations unaffiliated with the food industry; and received royalties for books on obesity and nutrition that recommend a low glycaemic load diet. FBH received research support from California Walnut Commission and lecture fees from Metagenics. LT received grants (to University of Lausanne) from the Swiss National Science Foundation from the Swiss Federal Bureau for Sport, and research support from Sorematec Italy (to Hôpital Intercantonal de la Broye) for a clinical trial related to physical activity in the treatment of patients with the metabolic syndrome; and received speakers fees from the Gatorade Sport Science Institute, Soremartec Italy, and Nestlé SA. JBM received research grants from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, the European Union, the Glycemic Index Foundation; and received royalties for books on nutrition that recommend a low glycaemic index diet. She oversees a glycaemic index testing service at the University of Sydney and is president and non-executive director of the Glycemic Index Foundation. Provenance and peer review: Commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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