Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Nutr. 2018 Apr 20. doi: 10.1093/jn/nxy020. [Epub ahead of print]

A Clear Difference Emerges in Hormone Patterns Following a Standard Midday Meal in Young Women Who Regularly Eat or Skip Breakfast.

Author information

1
The Nutrient Institute, Incline Village, NV.
2
Nutrition, Food Science & Packaging Department, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA.
3
Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA.
4
US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Obesity and Metabolism Research Unit, Davis, CA.
5
University of California Irvine Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, Irvine, CA.

Abstract

Background:

Multiple hormones are involved in the regulation of food intake and glucose metabolism. Past intervention studies showed a benefit of eating breakfast on satiety, but this was possibly confounded by the disruption of habitual meal patterns.

Objective:

The objective of this study was to compare hormonal responses, including insulin, leptin, glucagon-like peptide-1, ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY3-36), and cholecystokinin (CCK), between habitual breakfast eaters (Br-Es) and habitual skippers (Br-Ss) to a standard midday meal.

Methods:

Thirty-two women [mean ± SD age: 22.6 ± 3.3 y; body mass index (in kg/m2): 21.8 ± 2.0] participated in a cross-sectional study that consisted of a 3-h test protocol that included a standard test meal served at 1230 with pre- and postmeal blood sampling. The protocol required that Br-Es eat a typical breakfast between 0700 and 1000, whereas Br-Ss had no breakfast meal and had fasted for 12 h. Blood was drawn 35 and 5 min prelunch and 5, 20, 35, 50, and 110 min postlunch.

Results:

Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a group difference for PYY3-36 (P = 0.001), with the Br-E group exhibiting 50-90% higher concentrations throughout the test period. Leptin tended to be different (P = 0.08) between groups, with higher mean ± SD values for the Br-S group (27.6 ± 29.6 ng/mL) compared with the Br-E group (11.5 ± 9.8 ng/mL). Partial least squares regression analysis confirmed that these 2 hormones were important contributors to the patterns of the hormones, anthropometric, clinical, and behavioral variables that differed between groups; insulin and CCK were important as well.

Conclusion:

We found differences between the Br-E and Br-S groups in circulating gut and adipose-derived hormones measured midday, indicating that the breakfast habit is associated with the hormonal milieu before and after a midday meal. The different patterns may be short-lived or may impact metabolism later in the day. This report is a secondary analysis of a trial registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01427556.

PMID:
29897486
DOI:
10.1093/jn/nxy020

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center