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Elife. 2018 Jun 13;7. pii: e34465. doi: 10.7554/eLife.34465.

Signals from the brain and olfactory epithelium control shaping of the mammalian nasal capsule cartilage.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Department of Molecular Neurosciences, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
3
Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Brno, Czech Republic.
4
Institute of Science and Technology IST Austria, Klosterneuburg, Austria.
5
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Center for Innovative Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
7
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States.
8
Developmental Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany.
9
Genomics of Animal Development Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
10
Department of Developmental Biology, Institute of Experimental Medicine, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.
11
Department of Neuroscience & Cell Biology, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, United States.
12
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
13
Department of Development, Reproduction and Cancer, Institute Cochin, Paris, France.
14
Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia.
15
Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Facial shape is the basis for facial recognition and categorization. Facial features reflect the underlying geometry of the skeletal structures. Here, we reveal that cartilaginous nasal capsule (corresponding to upper jaw and face) is shaped by signals generated by neural structures: brain and olfactory epithelium. Brain-derived Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) enables the induction of nasal septum and posterior nasal capsule, whereas the formation of a capsule roof is controlled by signals from the olfactory epithelium. Unexpectedly, the cartilage of the nasal capsule turned out to be important for shaping membranous facial bones during development. This suggests that conserved neurosensory structures could benefit from protection and have evolved signals inducing cranial cartilages encasing them. Experiments with mutant mice revealed that the genomic regulatory regions controlling production of SHH in the nervous system contribute to facial cartilage morphogenesis, which might be a mechanism responsible for the adaptive evolution of animal faces and snouts.

KEYWORDS:

cartilage induction; cleft palate; developmental biology; embryonic development; facial shaping; mammalian face; mouse; regenerative medicine; sonic hedgehog; stem cells

PMID:
29897331
PMCID:
PMC6019068
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.34465
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

MK, JP, MT, BS, MK, MX, AK, KA, MK, OS, LP, FS, JK, MH, TZ, KS, MM, HW, UM, HA, PE, PM, MW, AC, KF, IA No competing interests declared

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