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Can J Diet Pract Res. 2018 Sep 1;79(3):118-124. doi: 10.3148/cjdpr-2018-010. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Dietary Intake and Micronutrient Supplementation in Youth with Celiac Disease with and without Type 1 Diabetes.

Author information

1
a Department of Agricultural, Food & Nutrition Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
2
b Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
3
c Department of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
4
d Department of Clinical Dietetics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
5
e Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
6
f Division of Gastroenterology & Nutrition, Stollery Children's Hospital, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.

Abstract

The study purpose was to describe dietary intake and the factors influencing micronutrient supplements (MS) use in Celiac Disease (CD) ± Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). Three-day food records collected from parents of youth (3-18 years) with CD (n = 14) ± T1D (n = 10) were assessed for macro and micronutrient intake, diet quality (DQ), glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and food group intake. Focus group methodology and thematic concept analysis were conducted to determine factors influencing adolescent MS use. Mean ± SD age was 11 ± 4.4 (CD) and 13 ± 3.7 (CD + T1D) (P = 0.32). Body mass index was within healthy reference ranges (17.9 ± 2.5 [CD]; 19.3 ± 3.8 [CD + T1D] kg/m2; P = 0.61). The majority of youth with CD ± T1D (>90%) had high intakes of sugar and saturated fat, had high GI and GL, and met food serving recommendations and DQs that were indicative of "needs improvement." With the exception of vitamin D, vitamin E, folate, calcium, and potassium, youth in both groups met the estimated average requirements (EAR) for most micronutrients. MS use corrected suboptimal vitamin D intake; however, vitamin E, folate, calcium, and potassium intake remained below the EAR. Variables influencing adolescent MS use included daily routine, health professional influence, disease management (CD + T1D), and lack of knowledge about the need for MS. Strategies to elicit adolescent MS use varied between parent and adolescents.

PMID:
29893137
DOI:
10.3148/cjdpr-2018-010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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