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Nat Commun. 2018 Jun 11;9(1):2275. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-04685-9.

Chronic hepatitis C virus infection irreversibly impacts human natural killer cell repertoire diversity.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine Huddinge, Center for Infectious Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, 14186, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
3
German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner Site Hannover-Braunschweig, Hannover Medical School, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
4
Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, 38124, Braunschweig, Germany.
5
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Essen University Hospital, 45147, Essen, Germany.
6
Department of Medicine Huddinge, Center for Infectious Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, 14186, Stockholm, Sweden. niklas.bjorkstom@ki.se.

Abstract

Diversity is a central requirement for the immune system's capacity to adequately clear a variety of different infections. As such, natural killer (NK) cells represent a highly diverse population of innate lymphocytes important in the early response against viruses. Yet, the extent to which a chronic pathogen affects NK cell diversity is largely unknown. Here we study NK cell functional diversification in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. High-dimensional flow cytometer assays combined with stochastic neighbor embedding analysis reveal that chronic HCV infection induces functional imprinting on human NK cells that is largely irreversible and persists long after successful interventional clearance of the virus. Furthermore, HCV infection increases inter-individual, but decreases intra-individual, NK cell diversity. Taken together, our results provide insights into how the history of infections affects human NK cell diversity.

PMID:
29891939
PMCID:
PMC5995831
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-04685-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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