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Nat Mater. 2018 Aug;17(8):691-696. doi: 10.1038/s41563-018-0104-7. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Reversible adsorption of nitrogen dioxide within a robust porous metal-organic framework.

Author information

1
School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
2
School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
3
Chemical and Engineering Materials Division (CEMD), Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA.
4
International Tomography Center SB RAS and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Russia.
5
College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China.
6
European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France.
7
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham Ningbo China, Ningbo, China.
8
Northern Carbon Research Laboratories, School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
9
School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. sihai.yang@manchester.ac.uk.
10
School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. m.schroder@manchester.ac.uk.

Abstract

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a major air pollutant causing significant environmental1,2 and health problems3,4. We report reversible adsorption of NO2 in a robust metal-organic framework. Under ambient conditions, MFM-300(Al) exhibits a reversible NO2 isotherm uptake of 14.1 mmol g-1, and, more importantly, exceptional selective removal of low-concentration NO2 (5,000 to <1 ppm) from gas mixtures. Complementary experiments reveal five types of supramolecular interaction that cooperatively bind both NO2 and N2O4 molecules within MFM-300(Al). We find that the in situ equilibrium 2NO2 ↔ N2O4 within the pores is pressure-independent, whereas ex situ this equilibrium is an exemplary pressure-dependent first-order process. The coexistence of helical monomer-dimer chains of NO2 in MFM-300(Al) could provide a foundation for the fundamental understanding of the chemical properties of guest molecules within porous hosts. This work may pave the way for the development of future capture and conversion technologies.

PMID:
29891889
DOI:
10.1038/s41563-018-0104-7

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