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CMAJ. 2018 Jun 11;190(23):E710-E717. doi: 10.1503/cmaj.170292.

The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project: a pan-Canadian platform for research on chronic disease prevention.

Author information

1
School of Population and Public Health (Dummer), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC; Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (Awadalla); CARTaGENE (Boileau), Montréal, Que.; Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (Craig, Fortier); Research and Innovation, University of Toronto (Goel); Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Goel); Atlantic PATH, Dalhousie University (Hicks), Halifax, NS; Centre hospitalier universitaire Sainte-Justine (Jacquemont); Centre of Genomics and Policy, McGill University (Knoppers, Zawati), Montréal, Que.; BC Cancer Research Centre (Le, McDonald), Vancouver, BC; Public Health Ontario (McLaughlin), Toronto, Ont.; Institut du cancer de Montréal, Université de Montréal (Mes-Masson); Pediatrics, CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center (Nuyt), Montréal, Que.; School of Public Health, University of Adelaide (Palmer), Adelaide, Australia; Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University (Parker); Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute (Purdue), Bethesda, Md.; CancerControl Alberta, Alberta Health Services (Robson, Vena), Edmonton, Alta.; Population Oncology, BC Cancer (Spinelli), Vancouver, BC; Atlantic PATH, Dalhousie University (Thompson), Halifax, NS trevor.dummer@ubc.ca.
2
School of Population and Public Health (Dummer), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC; Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (Awadalla); CARTaGENE (Boileau), Montréal, Que.; Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (Craig, Fortier); Research and Innovation, University of Toronto (Goel); Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Goel); Atlantic PATH, Dalhousie University (Hicks), Halifax, NS; Centre hospitalier universitaire Sainte-Justine (Jacquemont); Centre of Genomics and Policy, McGill University (Knoppers, Zawati), Montréal, Que.; BC Cancer Research Centre (Le, McDonald), Vancouver, BC; Public Health Ontario (McLaughlin), Toronto, Ont.; Institut du cancer de Montréal, Université de Montréal (Mes-Masson); Pediatrics, CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center (Nuyt), Montréal, Que.; School of Public Health, University of Adelaide (Palmer), Adelaide, Australia; Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University (Parker); Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute (Purdue), Bethesda, Md.; CancerControl Alberta, Alberta Health Services (Robson, Vena), Edmonton, Alta.; Population Oncology, BC Cancer (Spinelli), Vancouver, BC; Atlantic PATH, Dalhousie University (Thompson), Halifax, NS.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Understanding the complex interaction of risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing common diseases is challenging. The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (CPTP) is a prospective cohort study created as a population-health research platform for assessing the effect of genetics, behaviour, family health history and environment (among other factors) on chronic diseases.

METHODS:

Volunteer participants were recruited from the general Canadian population for a confederation of 5 regional cohorts. Participants were enrolled in the study and core information obtained using 2 approaches: attendance at a study assessment centre for all study measures (questionnaire, venous blood sample and physical measurements) or completion of the core questionnaire (online or paper), with later collection of other study measures where possible. Physical measurements included height, weight, percentage body fat and blood pressure. Participants consented to passive follow-up through linkage with administrative health databases and active follow-up through recontact. All participant data across the 5 regional cohorts were harmonized.

RESULTS:

A total of 307 017 participants aged 30-74 from 8 provinces were recruited. More than half provided a venous blood sample and/or other biological sample, and 33% completed physical measurements. A total of 709 harmonized variables were created; almost 25% are available for all participants and 60% for at least 220 000 participants.

INTERPRETATION:

Primary recruitment for the CPTP is complete, and data and biosamples are available to Canadian and international researchers through a data-access process. The CPTP will support research into how modifiable risk factors, genetics and the environment interact to affect the development of cancer and other chronic diseases, ultimately contributing evidence to reduce the global burden of chronic disease.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: Trevor Dummer reports grants from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer during the conduct of the study. Sébastien Jacquemont reports grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, grants from Genome Quebec, funding from the Cable Public Affairs Channel during the conduct of the study, and funding from Novartis and GW Pharmaceuticals outside the submitted work. Treena McDonald reports grants from Canadian Partnership Against Cancer during the conduct of the study. Paula Robson reports grants from the Alberta Cancer Foundation, grants from Government of Alberta via the Alberta Cancer Prevention Legacy Fund, grants from Alberta Innovates — Health Solutions via the Alberta Cancer Prevention Legacy Fund and grants from Canadian Partnership Against Cancer during the conduct of the study. Ma’n Zawati reports grants from Canadian Partnership Against Cancer during the conduct of the study.

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