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Am J Med Sci. 2018 Jun;355(6):524-529. doi: 10.1016/j.amjms.2018.02.007. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Antibiotic Timing and Outcomes in Sepsis.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky. Electronic address: rykim001@louisville.edu.
2
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.
3
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We evaluated the effect of time spent in the emergency department (ED) and process of care on mortality and length of hospital stay in patients with sepsis or septic shock.

METHODS:

An observational cohort study was conducted on 117 patients who came through the University of Louisville Hospital ED and subsequently were directly admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Variables of interest were time in the ED from triage to physical transport to the ICU, from triage to antibiotic(s) ordered, and from triage to antibiotic(s) administered. Expected mortality was calculated according to the University Health System Consortium Database. Primary and secondary outcomes were in-hospital death and hospital length of stay in days, respectively.

RESULTS:

We found no significant association between time in the ED and mortality between survivors and nonsurvivors (5.5 versus 5.7 hours, P = 0.804). After adjusting for expected mortality, a 22% increase in mortality risk was found for each hour delay from triage to antibiotic(s) ordered; a 15% increase in mortality risk was observed for each hour from triage to antibiotic(s) given. Both time from triage to antibiotic(s) ordered (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.8, P = 0.044) and time from triage to antibiotic(s) delivery (HR = 0.79, P = 0.0092) were independently associated with an increased hospital stay (HR = 0.79, P = 0.0092).

CONCLUSION:

Though no significant association between mortality and ED time was demonstrated, we observed a significant increase in mortality in septic patients with both delays in antibiotic(s) order and administration. Delay in care also resulted in increased hospital stays both overall and in the ICU.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotics; ICU; Length of stay; Sepsis; Timeliness

PMID:
29891035
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjms.2018.02.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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