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Parkinsons Dis. 2018 May 14;2018:1241757. doi: 10.1155/2018/1241757. eCollection 2018.

Oxidized DJ-1 Levels in Urine Samples as a Putative Biomarker for Parkinson's Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Life Sciences, Hanyang University, Ansan-si, Gyeonggido, Republic of Korea.
2
InAm Neuroscience Research Center, Sanbon Medical Center, College of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Sanbon-ro, Gunpo-si, Gyeonggido, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Neurology, Sanbon Medical Center, College of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Sanbon-ro, Gunpo-si, Gyeonggido, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. Oxidative stress is the most critical risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Numerous reports have demonstrated that oxidative stress aggravates cytotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons and accelerates the formation of protein inclusions. In addition, oxidative stress, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), oxidized protein, and dopamine quinone, are related to PD progression. DJ-1 is a PD-causative gene, and it plays a pivotal role as a sensor and eliminator of oxidative stress. Several studies have shown that oxidized DJ-1 (OxiDJ-1) formation is induced by oxidative stress. Hence, previous studies suggest that oxidized DJ-1 could be a biomarker for PD. We previously reported higher DJ-1 levels in Korean male PD patient urine exosomes than male non-PD controls. We speculate that OxiDJ-1 levels in PD patient urine might be higher than that in non-PD controls. In this study, we established an ELISA for OxiDJ-1 using recombinant DJ-1 treated with H2O2. Using Western blot assay and ELISA, we confirmed an increase of OxiDJ-1 from HEK293T cells treated with H2O2. Using our ELISA, we observed significantly higher, 2-fold, OxiDJ-1 levels in the urine of Korean PD patients than in non-PD controls.

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