Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jun;131(Pt A):701-711. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.04.067. Epub 2018 May 10.

Eutrophication may compromise the resilience of the Red Sea coral Stylophora pistillata to global change.

Author information

1
Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236, USA. Electronic address: emily8@mote.org.
2
Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236, USA. Electronic address: muller@mote.org.
3
University of Mississippi, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 1848, MS 38677, USA. Electronic address: tlgoulet@olemiss.edu.
4
The Interuniversity Institute for Marine Science, Coral Beach, 88103 Eilat, Israel; The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel.
5
Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236, USA. Electronic address: KRITCH@uscb.edu.
6
The Interuniversity Institute for Marine Science, Coral Beach, 88103 Eilat, Israel; The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel. Electronic address: Maoz.Fine@biu.ac.il.

Abstract

Environmental stressors are adversely affecting coral reef ecosystems. There is ample evidence that scleractinian coral growth and physiology may be compromised by reduced pH, and elevated temperature, and that this is exacerbated by local environmental stressors. The Gulf of Aqaba is considered a coral reef refuge from acidification and warming but coastal development and nutrient effluent may pose a local threat. This study examined the effects of select forecasted environmental changes (acidification, warming, and increased nutrients) individually and in combination on the coral holobiont Stylophora pistillata from the Gulf of Aqaba to understand how corals in a potential global climate change refugia may fare in the face of local eutrophication. The results indicate interactions between all stressors, with elevated nutrient concentrations having the broadest individual and additive impacts upon the performance of S. pistillata. These findings highlight the importance of maintaining oligotrophic conditions to secure these reefs as potential refugia.

KEYWORDS:

Climate change; Coral holobiont; Gulf of Aqaba; Nutrients; Ocean acidification; Stylophora pistillata

PMID:
29886997
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.04.067
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center