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Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2018 Dec;17(8):737-741. doi: 10.1177/1474515118780895. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Facilitators and barriers to research participation: perspectives of Latinos with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
1 Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, University of California Irvine, USA.
2
2 Program in Medical Education for the Latino Community (PRIME-LC), Health Policy Research Institute, Departments of Medicine and Family Medicine, University of California, Irvine, USA.
3
3 UCI Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, University of California Irvine, USA.
4
4 Department of Medicine, University of California Irvine, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Latinos constitute 17% of the US population and are one of the largest ethnic groups; however, only 7.6% participate in research studies. There is a disproportionately high number of Latinos living with type 2 diabetes mellitus and are at increased risk for cardiovascular events. Research to elicit facilitators and barriers for participation in research and effective recruitment strategies is limited.

AIMS:

This article reports the qualitative findings of a mixed-methods study examining perceived facilitators and barriers for research participation, and explores decision-making processes and ascertains ethnic values that influenced their decisions among Spanish-speaking Latinos with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

METHODS:

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 participants (mean age 50.8 ± 9.4 years, 76% women and 28% employed). Participants were asked to elaborate on perceived facilitators and barriers to research participation. All interviews were conducted in Spanish. Transcribed interviews were analyzed through conventional content analysis.

RESULTS:

Three themes emerged from transcribed interviews: (a) lowering barriers to access health-related expertise; (b) language concordance; and (c) trusting relationships. Perceived barriers to research participation included work schedule, childcare, transportation and ethnic beliefs.

CONCLUSION:

Strategies to support learning, language concordance and establishing trusting relationships among Spanish-speaking Latinos may be key to increasing Latinos in research studies.

KEYWORDS:

Latino; health disparities; research recruitment

PMID:
29886773
DOI:
10.1177/1474515118780895
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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