Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Nutr Biochem. 2018 Nov;61:1-16. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2018.04.004. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Nutritional modulation of the intestinal microbiota; future opportunities for the prevention and treatment of neuroimmune and neuroinflammatory disease.

Author information

1
Nevada Center for Biomedical Research, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St. MS 0552, Reno, NV, 89557, USA; University of Nevada, Reno, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, 1664 N. Virginia St. MS 0357, Reno, NV, 89557, USA. Electronic address: vlombardi@med.unr.edu.
2
Nevada Center for Biomedical Research, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St. MS 0552, Reno, NV, 89557, USA. Electronic address: de.meirleir@telenet.be.
3
Nevada Center for Biomedical Research, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St. MS 0552, Reno, NV, 89557, USA. Electronic address: ksm400@gmail.com.
4
University of Nevada, Reno, School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 1664 N. Virginia St. MS 0357, Reno, NV, 89557, USA; Advanced Therapeutic, General Gastroenterology & Hepatology Digestive Health Associates, Reno, NV, USA. Electronic address: samnourani@gmail.com.
5
University of Nevada, Reno, School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, 1664 N. Virginia St. MS 0318, Reno, NV, 89557, USA. Electronic address: rdagda@med.unr.edu.
6
Columbia University, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: sld2158@cumc.columbia.edu.
7
Kazan Federal University, Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, (Volga Region) 18 Kremlyovskaya St., Kazan, 420008, Republic of Tatarstan, Russian Federation; Asklepios-Med (private medical practice and research center), Kossuth Lajos sgt. 23, Szeged, H-6722, Hungary. Electronic address: palotas@asklepios-med.eu.

Abstract

The gut-brain axis refers to the bidirectional communication between the enteric nervous system and the central nervous system. Mounting evidence supports the premise that the intestinal microbiota plays a pivotal role in its function and has led to the more common and perhaps more accurate term gut-microbiota-brain axis. Numerous studies have identified associations between an altered microbiome and neuroimmune and neuroinflammatory diseases. In most cases, it is unknown if these associations are cause or effect; notwithstanding, maintaining or restoring homeostasis of the microbiota may represent future opportunities when treating or preventing these diseases. In recent years, several studies have identified the diet as a primary contributing factor in shaping the composition of the gut microbiota and, in turn, the mucosal and systemic immune systems. In this review, we will discuss the potential opportunities and challenges with respect to modifying and shaping the microbiota through diet and nutrition in order to treat or prevent neuroimmune and neuroinflammatory disease.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Autism; Gut–microbiota–brain axis; Microbiome; Multiple sclerosis; Myalgic encephalomyelitis; Neurocognitive; Neurotrophic; Oxidative stress; Parkinson's disease; Polyphenols; SCFA; Schizophrenia; Vitamin

PMID:
29886183
PMCID:
PMC6195483
[Available on 2019-11-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jnutbio.2018.04.004

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center